Electronics Assembly Knowledge, Vision & Wisdom
Nickel Hydroxide Corrosion Residues on Ceramic Packages
Nickel Hydroxide Corrosion Residues on Ceramic Packages
The findings of this study should help process engineers resolve package-related problems when nickel-gold finishes are utilized.
Analysis Lab

Analysis Lab programs cover topics including:
Corrosion, Contamination, Data Acquisition, ESD and EOS, Inspection, Measurement, Profiling, Reliability, R&D, RFID, Solder Defects, Test, Tombstoning, X-ray and more.
Submit A Comment
Comments are reviewed prior to posting. You must include your full name to have your comments posted. We will not post your email address.

Your Name


Your Company


Your E-mail


Your Country


Your Comment



Authored By:
Minerva M. Cruz and Russell T. Winslow
Six Sigma
Milpitas, CA, USA

Summary
This study focuses on identifying the residues found on the surface of high temperature co-fired ceramic packages after prolonged exposure to moisture. Using a "farming method", enough residue was created to facilitate a thorough analysis. Tests using SEM-EDS, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, Raman Spectroscopy, and X-ray Diffraction have identified these residues as primarily -Ni(OH)2 and -Ni(OH)2. Traces of tungsten oxide and a silicate compound were also detected.

The findings of this study should help process engineers resolve package-related problems when nickel-gold finishes are utilized. It may also help explain why pure gold finishes fail solderability testing after steam-conditioning -- a test they should otherwise pass with ease.

Conclusions
In this study, the residues found on the surface of goldplated HTCC substrates, after prolonged exposure to moisture, have been identified. These residues are a mixture consisting primarily of -Ni(OH)2 and -Ni(OH)2. Other constituents, which appear to be tungsten oxide and a silicate compound, were also found.

These -Ni(OH)2 and -Ni(OH)2 corrosion residues may help explain some issues found in integrated circuit manufacturing and packaging, such as:
  • solderability failures
  • die attach voids
  • variation in wire bond strengths
  • lid seal voids

Six Sigma has found that these corrosion residues need to be removed in order to promote good wetting, and hence, maximize board-level reliability.

Initially Published in the SMTA Proceedings

Comments
No comments have been submitted to date.
Free Newsletter Subscription
Every issue of the Circuit Insight email newsletter will bring you the latest information on the issues affecting you and your company.

Insert Your Email Address

Directory Search


Program Search
Related Programs
bullet Corrosion and Contaminant Diffusion Multi-Physics Model
bullet Characterization, Prevention and Removal of Particulate Matter on PCBs
bullet We Bake, But Still Have Delamination, Why?
bullet Last Will and Testament of the BGA Void
bullet Pad Cratering Susceptibility Testing with Acoustic Emission
bullet Characterization of Solder Defects in Package on Package
bullet Preparation for Mitigating Tin Whiskers in Alternative Lead-Free Alloys
bullet Analysis of Laminate Material Properties for Correlation to Pad Cratering
bullet What Causes Board Delamination?
bullet Risk and Solution for No-Clean Flux Not Dried Under Components
More Related Programs